Clearly: how different types of car actuators behave on slippery surfaces

Show how different transmissions act on the ice

Clearly: how different types of car actuators behave on slippery surfaces

No matter what car you drive, the power from the engine always likes to go on those wheels, which have at this point in time the least traction. This is often due to “jerky” behavior of the car on slippery surfaces the car rides, she’s not going. Because of this unpleasant side effect of the differentials, and they invented their more advanced options: limited-slip differential, and assistance systems – electronic traction control systems.

 

But is it possible to see how different it is to operate these or other types of motor drives? Yes, and now we clearly demonstrate that, because YouTube has a very easy to understand video that shows how different versions of the drives work on the same stretch of ice.

 

Clearly: how different types of car actuators behave on slippery surfaces

 

The point of the experiment is this: different on the mechanics of implementation of the drive rope cling to the stationary SUV. The driver presses on the gas, the wheels start to slip. This time, you can learn how each car gets traction.

 

 

The main conclusion of the experiment is that the differentials with limited slip help to send power to the wheel that can grip the ground/snow/ice/pavement. Other types of power assist electronic system. For example, in the video it is visible as there are two traction control systems: with brakes without them.

Here’s how the so-called “open differential”:

Clearly: how different types of car actuators behave on slippery surfaces

Power goes to the wheels with minimum traction. Options of lack of traction, as explained by the experimenters, can be mass – from a lack of grip before tilting and load each side of the car.

 

This type of drive is used on most cars with drive on one axis.

 

“Open differential” with electronic assistance systems:

Clearly: how different types of car actuators behave on slippery surfaces

Traction control, ABS and electronic stability control of the car trying to conceal the simplest type of differential. Note that it turns out well.

 

Thanks to the sensors the system by braking one wheel redistributes torque to the second. This happens in this particular example. However, there is another way to electronically cut power to the slipping wheel.

 

This system is not perfect, but allows to improve the car’s traction with monodrive at the crucial moment.

 

“The worm” limited-slip differential (like on a Subaru):

Clearly: how different types of car actuators behave on slippery surfaces

Another front-wheel-drive Ford. As can be seen, both wheels rotate at the same speed. Soberity and riders love this circuit for reliability and dependability. All the same mechanics, not the accessory electronic “crutches”.

 

Also quite interesting to see how the old all-wheel-drive Jeep Cherokee XJ and the new KL Jeep Cherokee with traction control are the same test. When it comes to maintaining forward motion on a slippery terrain, the modern jeep seems here is quite capable.

 

Four-wheel drive Jeep old model

Clearly: how different types of car actuators behave on slippery surfaces

As you can see, lack of electronic systems and smart differentials allows the vehicle to connect all the wheels at the same time. This once again tells us that the all-wheel drive system in the winter is not always the only solution to all problems, which I trust many drivers.

 

As if shame no sound, but on the ice might sit even a four-wheel drive monster.

 

 

Interesting: one thing I learned watching this show, which actually never came to my mind is the fact that the length of the propeller shaft of the vehicle also affects what wheels will rotate with a lack of grip.

 

In General, watching the other cars, among which there are a couple Subaru (with three differentials, including Central), minivan Ford Transit (electronics “turn off” the power at the wheels allowing them to rotate barely) and a pair of four-wheel drive Jeep: